Mattress Buying Guide

How to Shop for a Mattress

Disclosure: This site receives a payment from US Mattress, Overstock, 1800 Mattress, Leesa, Nest Bedding, Amazon, Sam’s Club, Macy’s, or Sears when you purchase a product using any links to that company in this article

I assume you’re reading this guide because you decided you need a new mattress (and not because you’re just curious about what’s going on in the world of mattresses these days). Perhaps your current mattress is hurting you, or you wake up tired. Maybe you just want a bigger size. Maybe you’re moving and don’t want to lug your old mattress from place to place. Whichever is the case, my goal is to help you select the right mattress so you don’t make a mistake and so you don’t pay a penny more than you have to.

A mattress is perhaps the most important piece of furniture in your home. If you get the recommended 8 hours of sleep per night, you will spend at least 1/3rd of your life in that mattress. That means if you keep that mattress for 9 years (which is about the average), 3 of those years will be spent on it. However, many of us don’t think about our mattresses and how it impacts our lives every day.

In this post, I will go over the basics on selecting the correct mattress. Elsewhere on the site, I will go into more detail on each of these topics and more, but this will be enough to get you started.

choosing a mattress

If you can find a mattress that keeps you in proper alignment while not causing any pressure to your body, you’ve found a good mattress for you. There are some other minor factors to look for. They include motion transfer, edge support, and temperature.

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Selecting the Right Mattress Store

Your first order of business will be to choose a store to shop at. Feel free to pick several to shop around at, especially if they’re near each other. There are several types of stores out there. I will give the pros and cons of each.

Learn More

Negotiating a Mattress Purchase

The prices of mattresses are negotiable at most retailers and on most brands. In mattress shopping, the general strategy is to play one retailer off of another. Most places have a price guarantee. So if you get a quote from one place, you can take it to a competitor and have them beat the price.

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Knowing How Much to Spend

Many people who I talk to have no idea what a mattress is supposed to cost. They hear specials on the TV along the lines of “pillowtop mattresses, queen size sets for only $299!” and they assume that it’s for a good quality every night use bed, and there are options even less than that.

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How to buy a mattress: the major factors

There are two major factors to look for in a new mattress. They are support & comfort.

How to Test for Support in a Mattress:

The most important factor in finding the correct mattress is proper support. You need the mattress to push up on your body to counteract your body weight. So that means get a hard, firm, stone-like mattress, right? Wrong.

Your body isn’t a straight line. Whether you sleep on your back, side, or stomach, your body has curves, and a mattress must come up to support the curves and arches of your body (similar to how a good shoe will have arch support). Consider the image below to illustrate:


You’ll notice that the mattress dips down around her shoulders and hips, but her spine is in proper alignment. If the mattress were too hard, her hips would be pushed up and her shoulders would be pushed up, and her spine would not be straight. If you’re in this position for too long, you can wake up with a back ache.

Additionally, if you keep changing positions to try to keep your back in alignment, you’re not getting into the deeper stages of sleep, which causes you to wake up tired. The same exact consequences occur if a mattress is too soft, and you’re in it like a hammock. You want a mattress to contour to the shape of your body to hold it in its neutral alignment.


How to Test for Comfort in a Mattress:

The second most important criteria to selecting the right mattress is comfort (or as you may hear it called, pressure relief). If a mattress is too hard, it can cause pressure to your body. This cuts off circulation and pinches nerves (ever wake up with a “pins and needles” feeling in your hand?), and will cause you to change positions frequently.

If you’re frequently changing positions, your sleep is fragmented and you don’t get into the deeper stages of sleep (such as REM sleep). This means you’ll wake up tired, even if you thought you got 8 hours of sleep. When you’re trying out the mattress, you should be able to lie in one position without moving around for at least a few minutes. If you can do that, you’ve found a good mattress.

Those are the two main criteria. If you find a mattress that keeps you in proper alignment which doesn’t cause pressure to your body, you’ve found a great mattress for you. To help fine-tune it from there, there are a few other things to consider.

Minor Factors

There are several other criteria that you can look for when searching for a mattress.

The mattress shopping experience

Walking into a mattress store can be an intimidating experience. When you first walk in, you’re likely to see a sea of white rectangles and what you perceive to be a slimy, sharky, salesperson out to rip you off. You might be tempted to throw up your hand, say “I’m just looking,” and run out of the showroom and buy online.

Luckily, the real mattress shopping experience isn’t nearly as bad as I just made it sound, and in this section, you will be better prepared to know where to shop. In this section of the guide, I will walk you through the process of actually trying out the mattresses and selecting the right one, as well as give you some tips to get the best possible price.

Choosing a mattress store

Your first order of business will be to choose a store to shop at. Feel free to pick several to shop around at, especially if they’re near each other. There are several types of stores out there. I will give the pros and cons of each.

Online:

You can always buy a mattress online. There are dozens, if not hundreds, of sites you can choose from. You can even go to Craigslist and get somebody’s used mattress for free (eww).

Pros: You get to shop for a mattress without leaving your house, you can shop dozens of companies quickly, and you’re likely to find a low price. In fact, websites like US Mattress tend to have the lowest prices anywhere. There are also direct-to-consumer mattresses like Leesa, Nest Bedding, and Ghost Bed which sell good mattresses at reasonable prices.

Cons: You can’t try the mattress! This is a huge risk to take with your money and your health. In the previous section, I talked about testing the mattress for comfort and support. How can you make sure the mattress contours to your back and doesn’t cause pressure on your side unless you try it?

If you buy one online without testing it, be sure to get one with a free return policy. The aforementioned online stores Leesa, Nest, and Ghost Bed are popular options for this. The free return policy completely negates the only con of buying online.

In fact, if all of this seems like a bit much, it would not be a mistake to just buy a Leesa, try it out, and if you don’t like it just send it back and iterate from there.

Another exception: If you try a mattress in person, you can buy the same or similar model online if you can do the comparison shopping. In fact, this is the strategy I recommend in my mattress negotiation guide.

(Read more about buying a mattress online here)

Big Box retailers:

These are stores like Sam’s Club and Costco. You can buy a mattress, a gallon of ketchup, and 144 rolls of toilet paper in the same trip.

Pros: Low prices, comparable to what you’ll find online.

Cons: Like online, you often cannot try all of the mattresses (they might have a couple out on display), and even if you can, you will get no expert help in selecting the right one. They also have a smaller selection. Lastly, you need to be a member at some of them.

Department stores:

Many department stores like Macy’s and Sears will have a section dedicated to mattresses.

Pros: You get to try the mattresses, most have a decent selection, and there will be a salesperson there to help you answer questions

Cons: The prices are a little higher at department stores than online or at big box retailers. You might need to take advantage of their price match guarantee. The salesperson there is not likely to be well-trained in selecting the right mattress, and very well might have been working in a different department a week ago. Also, there tends to be a lot more foot traffic through the department, so it’s awkward to try out the mattresses. Department stores also tend to play “games” with their prices, so be careful.

Beware of fake “regular” pricing at department stores. The “60% off” numbers are the regular retail price

Furniture stores:

Like department stores, furniture stores will also often have a section dedicated to mattresses. This is sensible, since a mattress is a piece of furniture.

Pros: It is convenient to have a whole bedroom set and a new mattress delivered at once. Sometimes they’ll give you a very low price on a mattress if you’re buying an entire bedroom set.

Cons: The salespeople aren’t usually specialized specifically on mattresses (though this varies by store). The selection is usually a little smaller than a mattress specialty store (but again, this varies)

Mattress specialty stores:

These guys sell just mattresses and items directly related to mattresses. Some are huge chains (like Sleepy’s and Mattress Firm), some are little local shops. The local shops vary wildly from high end boutiques to small guys trying to compete head-to-head with the big guys and anything in between.

Pros: Most salespeople will be well-trained and knowledgeable about mattresses and sleep. These will usually have the largest selections. Many of the large chains will have aggressive price match guarantees, so if you’re a good negotiator, you can get the lowest prices here. The boutique shops don’t often have any wiggle room, but they are also more fairly priced to begin with.

Cons: The retail prices tend to be higher (but again, most will have a price match guarantee and the most room for negotiation). The experience is highly dependent on how good the salesman is.

My recommendation:

I recommend doing one of two things.

  1. Shop at a mattress specialty store to find the right mattress, then take advantage of their price guarantee to get the lowest price. (If you need help comparing model names, consult my comparison charts here). If the salesman gives you a hard time about matching the price, just buy a comparable model online. Or…
  2. Buy a direct-to-consumer mattress like Leesa. With a 100 night free return policy, it’s a low risk investment. Try it out, and then send it back for a full refund if it’s not what you want. You can read my review of them here. For many of you, the Leesa will give you a great night’s sleep, and it’s an easy way to get out of “analysis paralysis.”

In the store

Alright, so you’ve selected a few stores to go to and you’ve checked out some online mattress stores to get a general lay of the land. Next, you need to set aside some time to properly try the mattresses. This is not a purchase that should be made over a lunch break or in a few minutes. Set aside an afternoon to go mattress shopping. Expect to spend up to an hour or so in a mattress store trying mattresses.

Next, you walk into a store, gaze upon the sea of white rectangles and are approached by a salesperson. What do you do?

The biggest thing to realize is that the salesperson is there to help you. Most salespeople I work with genuinely want to help you find the right mattress. The slimy “used car salesman” stereotype is somewhat uncommon (though not unheard of) in the mattress business. Just give him or her a chance to help you. Most of the better stores will have a process in place to help find the right mattress. But the key is to take the time to try the mattresses.

Once you’ve narrowed down which mattresses offer the proper support and relieve the most pressure, it’s important to spend some time on that mattress to make sure it works for you. If you’re having trouble deciding between two mattresses, spend several minutes on each one. Whichever you can spend longer in one position on without tossing and turning is likely the better mattress. Try it on your back, try it on your side. Remember to check for proper support and comfort.

How to negotiate for mattresses

I have a mattress negotiation guide, so read that for an in-depth treatment of this topic. I will just summarize here.

The prices of mattresses are negotiable at most retailers and on most brands. In mattress shopping, the general strategy is to play one retailer off of another. Most places have a price guarantee. So if you get a quote from one place, you can take it to a competitor and have them beat the price. Take that price to another competitor and get an even lower price. You can also look up the mattress online (like at US Mattress) and get the retailer to match the online price. This is the easiest, least painful way to negotiate on mattresses.

If you don’t have time to go back and forth between retailers, online prices are usually the best as long as you are good at comparison shopping. So you can find the mattress that works best for you, and then just buy the comparable model online.

Comparing mattresses can sometimes be tough, though, since the exact model name will differ between stores. Don’t let that scare you off, though, because the lineup is usually the same from retailer to retailer. For example, Simmons Beautyrest currently has their recharge lineup. They have 3 major levels of Beautyrests: the entry level ones, (which used to be called “classic”), the Platinum models (which used to be called “World Class”), and a luxury level above that which may differ from retailer to retailer (Beautyrest Black, Beautyrest Legend, etc).

Even though the specific model names will usually differ, a Platinum Luxury Plush at one retailer will be virtually identical to a Platinum Luxury Plush at another retailer.

Types of Mattresses

You might have noticed that in all of this time, I haven’t mentioned any details about the construction of the mattresses. I’ve said very little about coils, types of foam, etc. Truth is, this is possibly the least important part of the guide, but it’s still good to know.

There are two basic categories of mattress.

  1. Innerspring. These are the traditional mattresses with springs (or coils if you prefer). They can be all tied together or individually wrapped
  2. Specialty foam. These will usually be made of different types of foam. Two categories of specialty foam are latex and memory foam.

Beyond these two major categories, you’ll find a few other types of mattresses. Some manufacturers make air mattresses, that use air chambers instead of coils for the support. Also, there are still some waterbeds around, in which water is used for the support. I honestly don’t know as much about these two categories of mattresses, and they make up a small part of the mattress industry, so I won’t go into them here. The biggest air mattress manufacturer is Select Comfort with their Sleep Number bed. There are several small waterbed manufacturers.

There is also a category of beds called “hybrid beds” which have features similar to a specialty foam mattress on an innerspring support. I would call those much more similar to innerspring mattresses, but you can read more about hybrids here.

Innerspring mattresses

Most mattresses you’re likely to run into are the “innerspring” type. They have metal coils inside of the mattress with foams and fibers on the top.

The lower priced mattresses tend to use the older style coil in which they’re all tied together. The hourglass-shaped ones are called “Bonnell” coils, but other manufacturers have stronger variations on that type (like the “offset” coil and the “continuous” coil). These are generally a little less expensive than the individually wrapped coil, but don’t contour as well and transfer more motion.

On the left are Sealy “classic” coils that are all tied together. On the right are the higher end individually wrapped coils.

The better innerspring mattresses will use individually wrapped coils. This type of coil allows the mattress to contour to your body from the coil level, which give better support and causes less pressure. Additionally, wrapped coils are better at separating motion from side to side on the bed. So if one person bounces around or changes positions, the partner will not feel it as much. The downside? They’re usually more expensive.

The foams above the coils will have varying densities. You can get a mattress with firmer foams on the top or softer foams on the top. Some will be in the style of a “pillowtop” (which means the manufacturer sewed an extra cord around the side of the mattress to indicate it has a good amount of foam).

Don’t pay too much attention to the exact title of the mattress. One company’s “cushion firm” might be similar to another company’s “luxury firm” or even a “plush.” Just spend some time on each mattress and check for comfort and support, regardless of what the mattress is called or whether or not it’s technically a “pillowtop.”

What about coil count?

You may hear people talk about “coil counts.” There is a reason I’ve written this much and haven’t really mentioned them until now. They’re generally not important, as long as you’re not getting the least-expensive mattress. There are too many variables to consider to compare coil counts in one mattress to another. Type of coil, gauge (thickness) of the coil, the number of turns, whether or not its doubled up on the inside, etc. One mattress might have 1,000 coils, and another will have 900, but the 900 coil mattress might have a lot more steel in the coils overall.

The one thing I can say is to avoid is any mattress that has 420 or fewer Bonnell coils in a queen size. Those are only suitable for guest rooms, and they’re barely good for that. If the number is above that, you’re probably fine.

Specialty Foam

Foam mattresses are becoming much more popular, and they tend to get higher customer satisfaction ratings than innerspring mattresses (though they might not be what you’re used to). There are two major types of specialty foam, and a foam bed will usually have at least one of them, if not both. There is latex, and memory foam.

Memory foam is probably the most recognized type of foam in bedding. It is a slower-response foam (meaning it takes time to return to its normal position). This has the benefit of not causing pressure to the body. Memory foam is perhaps the best pressure-relieving material that is used in beds today.

Memory foam is often mixed with a type of gel to add additional support and to help keep a more neutral surface temperature. Older styles of memory foam (and cheaper Chinese memory foams) tend to retain heat. Most modern memory foam mattresses don’t have this issue.

Latex foam is the other type of common specialty foam. It tends to be more supportive than memory foam, a lot more durable (I personally have a latex pillow that has been in the same good condition for the past 6 years), it responds a lot more quickly than memory foam, and naturally keeps a more neutral temperature without relying on gel. However, it does not relieve pressure as well as memory foam does, and isn’t as good at separating motion. (Here is a more detailed look at latex foam)

Most of the time, these types of foam will be put on a base of what’s called “poly foam,” which is just a high density, resilient support foam. It’s not really designed for comfort, but it will hold the mattress up. Some lower-end mattresses are only made of poly foam, and these tend to feel harder.

Most of the new direct-to-consumer mattresses are foam mattresses, because they’re more easily compressed for shipping. This can be an inexpensive way to try out a foam mattress if you’ve been curious about them. (Leesa and Nest Bedding are my two favorite companies in this space).

The last thing to be careful of with specialty foam is to be wary of foams made in China. They tend to be lower quality and won’t hold up as long as many foams made in America or Europe. I made this mistake with my first mattress shortly after joining the industry. My mattress felt amazing for the first 6 months, but quickly lost both its comfort and support.

How much to spend

Many people who I talk to have no idea what a mattress is supposed to cost. They hear specials on the TV along the lines of “pillowtop mattresses, queen size sets for only $299!” and they assume that it’s for a good quality every night use bed, and there are options even less than that.

The mattress industry does itself a disservice by advertising like this, because that’s usually the absolute rock bottom as far as price and quality go.

You can find a mattress and boxspring set (in a queen size) for as low as $200 all the way up to as high as you want to spend. For example, a Tempurpedic Grand Bed with a motorized base can run you almost 10,000 dollars, and that isn’t even the most expensive mattress. So how much should you spend?

I’ll give a breakdown of what you can expect at each price range. This will vary by retailer and by region. If you live in the northeast, the prices will be towards the higher end, if you are in the middle of nowhere, the prices might be a little less. Additionally, these prices are for queen sized mattress and boxspring sets. Subtract ~100-300 for the boxspring, or multiply by ~50% for a king. (Note: These are what I consider the “real” prices for the mattresses, when they’re on sale. Retail prices might be much higher)

$0-200: This is probably a used mattress from Craigslist. Eww.

$200-400: These are your basic guest room mattresses. Expect to see those 420 coil Bonnell units I warned you about earlier. These may or may not have a pillowtop, and will have a 1 to 5 year warranty (click here for information about mattress warranties). Can be used by an adult for everynight use in a pinch, or if you’re on a really tight budget, but you don’t get much in the way of comfort or support.

$400-600: These range from some of the nicer guest room mattresses to maybe the bare minimum for every night use by an adult. You will either get nicer foams on the top than the cheaper ones, or stronger coils, but not usually both. The ones with a 10 year or more warranty will usually have no pressure-relieving foams up top at all, while the ones that have some nice layers of foam will probably still be using the 420 coil Bonnell unit. These tend to be good for college students on a budget.

$600-1000: These are about the average range for every night use mattresses. These are where a lot of your Sealy Posturepedics and Simmons Beautyrests live. You will get the better coil systems and advanced foams for coil mattresses. This is also the price range that the lowest priced memory foams start appearing. The direct-to-consumer mattresses I mentioned elsewhere in this article fall somewhere around this price range. If you find a memory foam mattress for significantly less than $600, you should be very skeptical. The Love & Sleep is at the low end here at $600 in a queen, while the Leesa is closer to the high end at $940 in a queen.

$1000-1500: These mattresses will be the entry level of the luxury mattress. The coil systems might be a little more advanced, or they’ll use thicker layers of the specialty foams. The foam mattresses will be a bit thicker, and you start getting into the big name brand memory foam models.

$1500-2500: Mattresses at this price range will have just about everything you could hope for in a mattress. You’ll get the thickest layers of the best foams, strong coil systems, and longer warranties. Many of your Tempurpedics live in this price range. If you’re spending $2,000 on a mattress, you’re very likely to be getting a great one. Warranties tend to be longer here too, ranging from 10-25 years.

$2500-5000: There’s honestly not much you can add to a mattress to get to this price range. The best Tempurpedics reach this range, and some of the most expensive Stearns and Foster luxury mattresses come up this high as well. You might start hearing about materials such as “New Zealand wool” and “Mongolian horse hair.” Only spend this much on a mattress if the ones at the lower tiers don’t keep you in proper alignment or relieve pressure as well and you have the money to spend.

$5000+: I’ve only ever tried one mattress in this range, a Duxiana, and it did not feel as good as mattresses for 80% less money. There’s only so much you can add to a mattress before it’s counterproductive. If you’re considering spending $5000 on a mattress, make sure it supports you and is more comfortable than the cheaper ones. Don’t just buy it because it’s expensive. If you really want to spend $5000 on your sleep set, your money would be better spent on accessories like an adjustable base for the mattress. I’d take a $3000 mattress with a $2000 adjustable base over a $5000 mattress any day.

Conclusion

To sum up, here are the bullet points about how to shop for a mattress:

I hope this helps you get a better night’s sleep without spending a penny more than you have to! For more information, read the related articles.

Disclosure: This site receives a payment from US Mattress, Overstock, 1800 Mattress, Leesa, Nest Bedding, Amazon, Sam’s Club, Macy’s, or Sears when you purchase a product using any links to that company in this article

Related articles

Should you buy a mattress in store or online?: Goes over the pros and cons of buying a mattress in-store vs buying one online.

Negotiating for a mattress: This page gives an easy to follow outline on how to get the best price on any mattress

Reasons you need a mattress protector: One of the key accessories to go along with the mattress is the mattress protector. This isn’t some kind of b.s. “upsell”; it’s actually important

Types of pillows: A guide to selecting the right pillow

What to look for in sheets: Sheets can be as confusing as mattresses to buy, and there’s a lot of terminology to learn. This guide helps streamline finding new sheets.

Tricks a dishonest salesman might use: Here is a list of things to watch out for when in a mattress store.

Additional Resources

Questions & Comments

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Susan B Orlansky Says

August 13, 2017 at 9:00 pm

We're looking into buying matress we got a price quoted from Serta Blue Touch 1000 from Matress Frim $1600 we went on overatock to compare something similar and the prices were $700 is there a major quality diffrence ?!??!?

MattressNerd Says

August 12, 2017 at 7:47 am

Mattresses these days are very different than how they used to be made. That hotel mattress that US Mattress recommended is an old-school style of design, but I'd be skeptical of buying it without trying it first since they don't have a free return policy (you can only exchange). I'd recommend trying out the Saatva. It's a direct-to-consumer mattress brand, and the only one I know of that makes their mattresses in a style reminiscent of older mattresses. Here's my review of them: https://www.mattressnerd.com/saatva-review/

Theresa Says

August 11, 2017 at 11:11 am

Hi, I would love to find my Sealy Posture Pedic Princess Royal mattress, that is no longer made. I bought it in 2003, I am looking for a traditional , no frills , firm mattress, no pillow top, good quality. Yes, I have had recommendations but I am still skeptical. The Serta Perfect Sleeper Hotel Regal Suite Double Sided Firm mattress at $866 was recommended by US Mattress? This is an exhausting process. Can you recommend one?

MattressNerd Says

August 9, 2017 at 8:24 pm

Keeping it and adding a topper will certainly help, especially if the topper is a softer memory foam. If you still have time on your return window, it's certainly worth trying out.

Maureen Says

August 9, 2017 at 7:51 am

I was wondering ......I like the memory foam best, i am a 60 yr old female, thin frame, side sleeper with arthritis. Would it be a good idea for me to buy an inexpensive soft mattress and then put a 3 inch memory foam topper on it? rather than buy an expensive memory foam mattress? I had a Tuft and Needle mattress which i am in the process of returning, it was much too firm for me .......I was almost thinking of keeping it and putting a 3 inch memory foam topper on it..........would that work ?

Laura Becker Says

July 29, 2017 at 9:15 pm

Hi, We have a Sealy Posturepedic mattress which is a Springmoss Circle ( unknown year).We are now are seeing Costco has a Sealy Posturepedic mattress called West Salem ..Both are firm are they comparable? Also what Simmons Beautyrest is comparable in firmness to West Salem..Thanks

Briana Says

July 29, 2017 at 9:06 am

I have been considering the Rock Springs firm mattress set from the Sealy Performance Collection, the Golden gate Luxury Firm Pillow top from the Beautyrest Silver line, and the Applause II firm mattress from Serta. Which would you suggest from best to least in terms of the quality of the mattress. Thanks.

MattressNerd Says

July 16, 2017 at 10:55 am

You won't find anything exactly the same, or even very close to the Isabel. The lineup has changed significantly in the past 5 years.

Nancy DelPresto Says

July 16, 2017 at 10:42 am

I have been a fan of Stearns and Foster for about 20 years. About 5 years ago I bought 2 queen mattresses at my local Macy's. They are from Estate collection, are in the luxury firm category and are named Isabel. The boys loved them then and now as do I. Two years ago I had to replace our queen (from a sinking 15 year old Stearns and Foster) and I went back to Macy's tried to find Isabel again but found out that the Isabel did not exist anymore. After trying out several models in the store, I chose a Beckinsale luxury firm; after delivery and trying for 2 months, we returned it! It was way too firm.(It seems the ones in the store are pretty well broken in so do not represent an acurate feel. ) Stearns and Foster recommended a Baroque, a "limited edition collection", which we bought and now sleep on. It is fine but even now the comfort of the Isabel is still top ranked. After that rambling background story, I am trying to find, once again, a mattress similar to Isabel. I want to do this on line as it is for my son who is moving to Boston in a few weeks and I want to buy and have them deliver it to his apartment. I found your comparison chart and will go to lie on the estate lux Everwood and the estate Palace at my local Macy's but will know that the feel may not be accurate. I don't have a Sears or a Bloomie's in my area, that is why I have chosen Macy's. Would you have an way of researching the Isabel and finding me a comparable mattress to the Isabel?? Thanks for your time

Darin Says

July 15, 2017 at 2:34 am

For the under $1500 dollar models, how do we get the best bang for the buck?

MattressNerd Says

July 10, 2017 at 7:09 am

It's closer to the 1000-1500 range, especially since that's an old model that's being discontinued and the prices are lower than they generally are. But those aren't hard cutoffs. They're general rules. I've seen that mattress go for as much as almost $2,000 at some retailers.

John Says

July 6, 2017 at 8:43 am

Hello, Question on the "How much to spend" section. In example, the mattress I am interested is the Simmons Phillipsburg II Plush which comes up as $852 from your mattress comparison page. On the Us-mattress page, the original price is $1146. Based on your chart, do we put this in the category of $600-$1000 or $1000-$1500 range?

Deb Says

June 30, 2017 at 8:28 pm

We are looking to move our 6 foot 1 inch son, who is 17, from a twin to a full mattress and box spring. We are really concerned about price but don't want to buy junk either. He will use the bed everynight for a few years, then we anticipate he will only be home on vacations from college. Any recommendations?

MattressNerd Says

June 25, 2017 at 3:50 pm

I have an article on those here: https://www.mattressnerd.com/adjustable-bases/

Sam Says

June 25, 2017 at 1:43 am

We would like to purchase an adjustable base, what are your thoughts? The seem expensive. Thank you

beth Says

May 29, 2017 at 9:49 am

Hello! Thanks for the article, been buying beds my whole life, about to replace every night bed with a full, from a twin. Tiny room, but just gotta get a little bigger for comfort. I want to try it in the store today memorial day. tips for best price? i used to love firm, with 50 something's aches and pains, thinking i need still firm support but with a little cushion. not interesrted in a foam that will go bad in 6-8 months....i'm okay with not the newest fangled gel blah blah even the pillowtops sometimes are too squishy....so.....just wondering where you would stear me . southwest florida, i've got a haverty's, (leaning towards this because of best reviews/cust satisfctn) asheleys, pennys walmart target sears macys of course, but those last sound like th elast place i should go..... i've heard sleepy's a bad chain, or gets the worst ratings in my area.....We have an FOS furniture store with mattresses will also stay away from RTG...

Jim S. Says

May 27, 2017 at 5:10 pm

That's pretty good then because my original goal was to find a Grant Park Cushion Pillow Euro Pillow top and it seems it is the same. That mattress got high ratings in Consumer Reports. I just hope I am thrilled with it 6 months down the line as there is no returns at Woot.com. But at that price it is worth the risk.

MattressNerd Says

May 27, 2017 at 4:47 pm

On my Sealy 2016 comparison chart, that's the same as the ones in the row that begins with Cooper Mountain Cushion Firm Pillowtop.

Jim S. Says

May 27, 2017 at 11:41 am

Wow! I notice today that Woot.com has a Sealy they call the Smithland Cushion Firm Euro Pillow top set for $428. That seems a hell of a deal. Can I assume that it is equivalent (or at least close) to any other Cushion Firm Euro Pillow top?

MattressNerd Says

May 27, 2017 at 11:22 am

Good questions. 1) Generally, "foam encasement" is better than having coils all the way to the edge with a "border wire" holding them together. The border wire is uncomfortable to sit on and is prone to bending. 2) I have an article on boxsprings here. 3) There is no "best coil count" because it depends on too many factors. For example, an old-school coil system in which the coils are all tied together will need fewer coils than individually wrapped coils. For coil gauge, the lower the number, the firmer it will feel. But if it's too firm, it will just feel hard and uncomfortable, so there is no "best" number there either. In theory, the lower gauge coils should be more durable, but the padding in a mattress will wear out years, if not decades, before the coils do.

MattressNerd Says

May 27, 2017 at 11:19 am

Sealy recently changed their lineup, and retailers are in the process of phasing out the old lineup, of which the Grant Park and its comparables were in. The new models won't be exactly the same as the old one, but they'll be fairly similar.

Linda Says

May 27, 2017 at 1:36 am

What are your thoughts on the coils going all the way to the mattress edge verses a border of foam? Also, what about a box spring, what is the best to look for with the box spring? For a queen, best coil count and gauge numbers? Thank you.

Jim S. Says

May 26, 2017 at 8:15 pm

I am interested in a Sealy Posturepedic Cushion Firm Euro Pillow. Macy's had one called Grant Park and was highly rated. Alas, no longer available. Sears has one called Chaleigh, but not available in stores and another called Ridgeway Place which is much pricier. and one called Dolby in the store. Another chain called Younkers/Elder Beermans has a model labelled Serious. Lastly, Costco has a model called Meadowdale (which is on the chart)-but not in the store). I've tried them in a couple stores and I like the feel. Based on the review in Consumer Reports I think it would be a good choice. Are all these company labels of the Sealy Cushion Firm Euro Pillow essentially the same mattress?

MattressNerd Says

May 18, 2017 at 11:05 am

It's good for an innerspring mattress. It has a more "old school" feel than a lot of the other direct-to-consumer mattresses out there.

John Wilson Says

May 18, 2017 at 10:46 am

What about Saatva Luxury Firm. What is your comment

MattressNerd Says

May 16, 2017 at 9:42 am

They're a basic Chinese foam mattress, good for temporary use or guest rooms.

Emily Thompson Says

May 16, 2017 at 9:04 am

I have searched everywhere for reviews on the Wayfair Sleep brand that is not on wayfair.com but am having no luck. What can you tell me about their mattresses?

Colleen Eastman Says

March 11, 2017 at 1:41 pm

My boyfriend and I bought a new mattress a couple of months ago and we really dont like it. It has the edge support and I find that that causes us to both roll into the middle of the bed as the edges are a bit higher then the rest of the mattress. This basically means that there are about 4 inches of bed on each side that we cant sleep on because it causes our bodies to be on a slant...Why do they make all of the new mattresses this way and does anyone else have this problem?

J Says

January 31, 2017 at 1:06 am

every mattress I have owned sank in the middle. I got so fed up that I now sleep alone on a full size self made mattress which consists of a platform with two single sized thick foam pads laying next to each other with an egg carton full sized foam pad on top of them, then repeated on top. It is hot because of the foam but cheap. I am ready for 'breathability' and sturdy durability in a hotel mattress hoping that will not sink in the middle. thanks for the tip. I'll check out Serta. J

Thomas Gotzler Says

January 23, 2017 at 11:41 pm

I've owned a Simmons Beautyrest Black for 3 years. It's sagging now like all the rest. I would recommenced staying away from this brand.

MattressNerd Says

January 18, 2017 at 2:40 pm

Being able to flip the mattress has little impact on how long it lasts. The problem is mattresses are using a lot more padding than anything years ago. A pillowtop back then may have used 3 inches of foam on each side. Now, even a non-pillowtop will use like 4 or 5 inches on one side. That said, Serta sells some double-sided hotel-style mattresses on US Mattress and Sam's Club.

J Says

January 14, 2017 at 11:31 pm

Where can I get a HOTEL STYLE mattress that is stuffed on both sides. The pillow tops that were entering the market ten years or so ago were really just a marketing diversion away from getting only half a tube of toothpaste. If you have not noticed lately all your products you buy to day are 1/3 to 1/2 less than even a few years ago. Mattresses today cannot be flipped like a pancake which explains why they sag. I have gone thru five mattresses in the last ten years with the same problem; sagging in the middle. A hotel style mattress will have stuffing on top and stuffing underneath and coils in the middle. You can flip it and turn it like a record on a record player which helps round out the use. But to fine one that isn't 5,000 is the challenge. Any input on that? Thanks

MattressNerd Says

December 11, 2016 at 3:44 pm

I haven't tried anything by Christeli, but they seem to use strong materials, so if you've tried them and they're comfortable, I'd say go for it. I would not recommend a split queen base. There aren't many split queen adjustable bases out there, there are virtually no split queen mattresses to go with them, and you'd be nearly doubling the price for no reason.

Larry LaCroix Says

December 11, 2016 at 1:39 pm

I'm a huge fan of this site. Thanks for all of the info. I'm looking at getting a Christeli Briella or Danilei with an adjustable base. Two questions for you: First, what do you think of Christeli (I like the fact that they are hand made in the U.S. and have been in business since 1931) or would you recommend a different comparable brand. Second, what do you think of an adjustable base that is a 'split-queen'? Is it reasonable or should I stick with a base for the full queen - and do split queens require two different bottom fitted sheets?

Jill Says

December 8, 2016 at 6:04 am

Hello, Thank you for the great guide! I really enjoy the beds when I stay at Marriott hotels. What are your thoughts about hotel mattresses? Are you familiar with the quality of mattresses they purchase?

MattressNerd Says

November 26, 2016 at 5:45 pm

Mattresses were very different 10 years ago. It's unlikely you'd find one that's the same. New models come out every year or two, and a lot of foams are common in mattresses now that just weren't around a decade ago.

Leah Says

November 26, 2016 at 1:39 am

Hello & Thank you! I purchased a BR about 10 years ago and I love it...I don't suppose you know if I can find this same mattress now? I was looking into the current Beautyrest line, "Recharge" (comparable in price as my current one) and it seems to have an issue with stability (sinking in the center after 10 months or so). This is really disheartening because I LOVE my current 10 year old BR and wanted to simply replace it :-) thanks in advance!

MattressNerd Says

November 25, 2016 at 8:31 am

Returned mattresses at retail stores are generally recycled. The more expensive ones will be sold out "outlet" stores where they're clearly marked as refurbished. The online direct-to-consumer mattresses with return policies will generally donate their mattresses to charity or recycle them.

teresa Says

November 25, 2016 at 12:18 am

I wonder what the places that say you can return the mattress within a certain amount of days, do with all of those mattresses? i hope they do not let others try out the ones that have been used. I just wish i could find a soft mattress that is also firm enough for my husband that does not start sinking in the middle and then making me feel like I am rolling onto my husbands side of the bed and also a mattress that stays cool with hot flashes.

lynne lohmeier Says

November 14, 2016 at 8:37 am

HI, LOVE your advice. Two questions, must you have a box springs under a good mattress? If so, do they usually come with the mattress or do you have to then go shop for a good box springs? What happens if you don't have a box springs? I have a titanium hip joint (18 total surgeries). I CANNOT allow my left leg to go over the top of my right, so I need something to help me stay in certain positions. Would a harder mattress help with that? If you know about these, what comment do you have about a futon bed? Hubby had one, it was fine at first, then grew lumpy. Thanks so much for your advice; like you said, 1/3 of your life in bed, and if you read there or otherwise spend time on (I studied one who summer on my bed), even more time!

MattressNerd Says

November 11, 2016 at 1:16 pm

One of my main concerns about Chinese made mattresses is the quality of foam and consistency of the manufacturing. There are some factories that are good, and some that just aren't. It's kind of a crap shoot when it comes to Chinese mattresses. The CertiPUR-US certification does not address that. Almost every mattress has it. If you find one that doesn't, stay far away from it, but those are fairly rare.

Jo Says

November 6, 2016 at 9:57 am

I really appreciate your site. It has opened our eyes on what to look for and what to "look out" for! My husband and I tried out a 'GelCare Memory Foam by Health Care' that has the "CertiPUR-US" seal. In my research, I found that their mattresses are designed in America, but made in China. You mention being wary of purchasing a memory foam bed made in China. I was wondering if the "CertiPUR-US" seal wipes that worry away. The mattress we are looking at is sold at American Furniture Warehouse and I verified the store as one of the listings on the CertiPUR-US website. Thank you for your input. Jo

MattressNerd Says

November 4, 2016 at 5:12 pm

For the most part, those "sale" prices will be roughly the price they're normally sold at. Almost nobody actually pays the "retail" price.

Sue Says

November 4, 2016 at 11:51 am

So looking at Sears for mattresses and hey have some on sale, the normal prices are anywhere from $400 to $1200 but most are on sale at 60% less. Do you think they are mostly low cost mattresses to begin with? I've never purchased a 'good' mattress before but want one that provides me with a good sleep but doesn't break the bank. :(

Kate Says

October 4, 2016 at 5:27 pm

I'd like a memory-foam mattress, but softer than the Leesa. I'm light and find most mattresses too firm. If the Leesa is a 3.5, maybe a 5 on your scale from concrete to marshmallow. Medium-soft rather than medium-firm. What mattress would you most recommend for this level of softness/firmness?

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October 1, 2016 at 6:26 pm

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Linda Says

September 29, 2016 at 12:48 pm

Do you know if there are any toxic products in the Applause II serta icomfort plush matress and if it is a good mattress for back and side sleeping with durability?

David Says

September 9, 2016 at 8:46 pm

I just wanted to thank you for your mattress buying guide. After reading it, I felt I was ready to purchase a new mattress, which I've always dreaded because of the negotiation during the sale. That being said, I was able to negotiate from the "sales price" of $2,500 to $1,400. The unbelievable "regular" price was $5,000! The salesperson's first offer was around $1,800. I countered with $1,200, which he said he couldn't do but he then counted with about $1,400, which we accepted. We probably could've negotiated a bit lower but were already exhausted from the experience. So if my math's right, we saved about 45% and also got free delivery. When I bought my first mattress around thirteen years ago, I had no idea you could negotiate. Somewhere over the years, I discovered you could negotiate and I'm glad I did. I've asked my boss and co-workers if they knew you could negotiate on mattresses and they didn't know. My parents didn't know either! I don't believe the other customers in the mattress stores we visited knew either as I heard no negotiations going on. Also, before we got to the store, I made sure I knew what type of mattress we wanted so I would give the salesperson some idea that I knew what I was talking about and that I wouldn't be taken advantage of. After greeting the salesperson, he asked what we were looking for and I told him I was looking for a queen, somewhere between plush and firm, with enclosed coils. That also helped narrow down the beds so the buying experience didn't take too long. I just wanted to say thanks again! With your website and a bit of research about what type of bed you're looking for, I believe anyone can get a great deal on a new mattress. We just took delivery of our new mattress this morning!

MattressNerd Says

September 5, 2016 at 9:31 am

That's a fairly basic foam mattress, though it's tough to know for sure exactly how good it is because Sams doesn't list any specs (like how many inches of memory foam it uses on top vs how many inches of HR poly foam in the base). At that price, I suspect it uses fairly low density foam, so I wouldn't expect it to last very long if used every night. That sort of thing is generally fine for a guest room since it won't wear out as quickly.

Greg S. Says

September 4, 2016 at 8:54 am

In the market for 2 things. First is a new queen size that will eventually become a guest bed. I'm staying with family for a couple months and the current bed needs to go...when I move into my place I will need another mattress for my personal daily use, so was going to use this queen purchase as a test of sorts. Dig my friends foam mattress, so wanted to go that route. That being said, is this an good, or am I cheaping out? Your advice I've seen here generally says anything below a certain amount isn't any good.... http://www.samsclub.com/sams/avesta-king-10-in-gel-foam/prod18860490.ip

MattressNerd Says

August 24, 2016 at 4:07 pm

I haven't tried them. They don't seem to have anything particularly special about them, but nor do I see anything obviously wrong with them either.

MattressNerd Says

August 24, 2016 at 4:05 pm

I haven't tried the Cocoon, but Sealy doesn't list any specs about what foams they use. If it's anything like the foam they use in their Optimum lineup, I'm not terribly impressed with the quality. But, I don't know that for sure, because again, they don't say what foam they use.

Ryan Says

August 23, 2016 at 9:20 pm

Do you have an opinion on Amerisleep products? That name had repeatedly surfaced in online review searches. In particular the Revere and Liberty lines.

Brian Says

August 22, 2016 at 10:05 pm

We're thinking about getting either a Leesa or a new(er) Sealy Cocoon. Wondering if you know anything or have opinions of the Cocoon. Looks like they are about the same price point.

MattressNerd Says

August 22, 2016 at 7:51 am

Many mattresses don't have the "slow" feel of Tempurpedic. You mention latex and that's a good option. If she liked the Beautyrest Black hybrid, she may also like the Sealy Posturepedic hybrids which are significantly less expensive. Saatva is decent, but it's a very different construction than most modern mattresses.

Adam Says

August 21, 2016 at 6:44 pm

Hi Mattess Nerd, My wife needs a soft mattress as she is lightweight, a side sleeper, and wants to sink in to keep her back straight. She does not like the "slow" feel of the Tempurpedic. Is there a memory foam/latex Mattess that would be good for her? She really likes the soft pillow top innerspring mattresses so far. We checked out the Beautyrest Black Kingston Hybrid Pillow Top, which is nice but expensive. Didn't seem that much better than the lower qauality models. We were also thinking of the plush Saatva if we stay with innersprings. Appreciate any thoughts or comments you may have. Thank you!

MattressNerd Says

July 24, 2016 at 2:22 pm

I can think of no reason why a light child would need a hard mattress. Harder mattresses are good for heavier people generally speaking. Your child doesn't need a lot of support to keep him in alignment.

avi Says

July 23, 2016 at 9:10 am

Hi, i read all your suggestions (in english), even i searching for a mattress in israel (hebrew web sites)... i looking for a mattress to my child (he is 10 years old, and is weight 30 kg). in israel (here: www.mizran.co.il/מזרוני-קיסריה-קלאוד-לטקס.html ) they explain that i need to choose a hard mattress with 3 c"m of latex (they said it's more soft), i'm asking you because my son is sleeping now on 8 c"m soft mattress and he said it's is very comfortable to him and he don't want a hard mattress, what to do? p.s the old mattress is stink and i must replace it

MattressNerd Says

July 22, 2016 at 9:25 am

I'd recommend looking into a memory foam mattress. That should solve the problems based on what you've said, but they tend to feel quite different, and not everybody can get used to it.

Laura! Says

July 21, 2016 at 10:59 am

We are finally for a new bed, but are unsure of which to pick. My husband is 5'8" - 170# and primaryly a back sleeper - and a sometimes side sleeper. He loves our current mattress --- Simmons beauty rest Carmel plush pillow top. I do not. I am 5'7" about 180# and primaryly a side sleeper and sometimes back. I also usually sleep with a pillow between or under my knees (since forever) But our current bed - makes my hip & shoulder sore when I sleep to the point of waking me up & causing me to toss and turn. And (un)lucky for my husband the motion transfer from my tossing and turning wakes him up. What's your suggestion for a bed for us? Thanks! Laura

MattressNerd Says

July 18, 2016 at 8:14 pm

You're only 20 pounds heavier than I am, and the Leesa is fine for me. The problem for a heavier side sleeper is if you get one too firm, you'll feel pressure in your shoulder or your hip. That's why half of the direct-to-consumer mattresses (including Tuft and Needle) don't really work for me. They use thinner layers of "comfort" foams in the top, so I feel like I "bottom out" on the mattress when I'm on my side. I don't have that issue on the Leesa. In any case, they all have free return policies, so if you get one that doesn't work, it's not a huge mistake.

Brian Says

July 18, 2016 at 1:39 pm

I'm glad to see you still reply to comments to this. I've been sleeping on an Ikea Matrand for a while and it is at the end of it's life; I'm trying to upgrade slightly because I can afford another few bucks for a mattress and I'm also past 50 so my body is a bit more picky about where it sleeps. I've seen mattresses ranked by firmness, I'm tempted to get a Leesa because my wife and I are both side-sleepers at least part of the time, but I'm pretty heavy and I'm afraid the mattress won't be supportive enough. A Tufts mattress seems to be firmer but then it is recommended for back sleepers. Any thoughts on which would be better? Or can you point me toward a resource that might explore mattresses for heavier people? I'm 260 pounds. Thank you.

Lora Says

July 16, 2016 at 1:54 pm

Great. Thanks for sharing

Chris Says

June 27, 2016 at 11:06 am

We're 'short' (@ 5ft6in); & the 'smooth-top, ultra-firm' Sealy-mattress we plan to buy is '11.5in' high. So the "low-profile" (@ 5in) is probably best (for us)... given the anticipated overall net 'height-reduction' of 1.5-2 inches, resulting-in a lower 'top-of-mattress' height (above 'floor-level') of 26-26.5 inches. Further, I'd suspect that... 'with the mattress-top being-a-bit-lower'... it would 'help to maintain/preserve' the "strong edge-support" characteristic that this particular mattress possesses.

Chris Says

June 27, 2016 at 10:31 am

Thanks very-much for your recommendation... which is as I'd suspected given our '15+ yr-old' mattress-set.

MattressNerd Says

June 27, 2016 at 7:02 am

There's no difference in quality. One is 4 inches taller than the other, and that's it. It all depends on whether you have a really high bed frame or are getting a really thick mattress (or you're short). In those cases, a low profile boxspring would be good. Otherwise, the standard is fine for most people.

MattressNerd Says

June 27, 2016 at 7:00 am

If your old boxsprings are more than about 5 years old, I'd recommend new ones. I'd also recommend new ones if it's a different type of boxspring (rarely these days, you'll find boxsprings with actual springs in them. Sealy uses a rigid foundation).

MattressNerd Says

June 27, 2016 at 6:59 am

Two twin XLs is a king. There's no such thing as a one-piece king boxspring or adjustable base. In every case I've seen, a king base is the same price as two twin XLs, because it's the same items. You can get an adjustable base from a lot of places, but one place that has a large selection is Amazon. Check out my Adjustable Base page for more info.

Chris Says

June 26, 2016 at 5:49 pm

As far as 'Box-Springs' go... with regard to the 'above comment'... Sears is offering a "Standard Split" (9-in), or a "Low-Profile Split" (5-in). Which one would you recommend, please... & 'why'? Thank You

Chris Says

June 26, 2016 at 5:15 pm

Good Evening, My wife & I had found a Sealy mattress @ Macy's that we really liked... but we delayed the purchase, & Macy's 'discontinued' the mattress. In our search to find its "equivalent", a Sealy 'Customer Service' rep was kind enough to tell me 'precisely what to ask for'... to precisely-match the Macy's mattress that we like so much. And as such, I've just located same on the internet. My question is: as we're buying a new-mattress, is it equally-important (necessary?) to purchase new 'box-springs' (California King) as well? And if 'Yes'... I'm assuming we should get a 'matching-set'. Incidentally, we're getting the "Sealy Posturepedic Plus Series" Ultra-Firm mattress... FYI. Thank you.

Shari Says

June 26, 2016 at 2:11 pm

So glad to have found this site! My husband and I are in our early 50's and both dealing with joint pain and stiffness. Our current king sized innerspring mattress is 18 years old and is definitely not giving us a good night's sleep. We sleep with a total of 10 pillows (and two black labs!) to try to get more comfortable. Would an adjustable base be a good investment for us? I just clicked on the Leesa link here and their mattresses sound great. There is no mention of bases or boxsprings on their website. If we buy the mattress from Leesa, where would you suggest we buy the adjustable base? Should we go with two twin XLs or a king? Thanks for providing this great service.

MattressNerd Says

June 24, 2016 at 9:56 am

In some ways it doesn't matter, because what's right for me might not be what's right for you. That said, I sleep on a Leesa.

sophie Says

June 22, 2016 at 8:51 am

Hi, What mattress do you sleep on?

Cindy Says

June 16, 2016 at 1:30 pm

Thank you! I read the warranty info that came with the mattress and it said they wouldn't warranty it if it was on a rigid foundation. I am assuming my solid wooden platform is a rigid foundation? The platform was cut down the middle to get it up stairs and I have it back together in the middle with hinges, so there is a little play, but it's basically two pieces of solid wood hinged together on a drawer unit. I think there might be an issue with that. The salesman was new and I told him I was putting it on a platform bed. It is getting better, but I don't want to lose a 25 yr warranty because I put it on the wrong foundation? How do I proceed? Or just forget about it? Thank you again! Your advise is truly invaluable.

MattressNerd Says

June 15, 2016 at 12:47 am

The mattresses are generally absurdly expensive when you go that route. Serta cannot undercut its retail partners, so unless you're buying hundreds or thousands of mattresses, you will overpay.

Jonathan Goins Says

June 14, 2016 at 10:31 am

Any thoughts on buying a "hotel bed" (flippable) direct from a place like Serta? How do they differ from the standard models?

MattressNerd Says

June 14, 2016 at 3:32 am

I don't have any recommendations there, sorry. Those mattresses tend to be very different from regular mattresses and usually not high quality.

MattressNerd Says

June 14, 2016 at 3:31 am

Most mattresses are designed to work on a rigid foundation. If the Kingsdown happened to have a boxspring with actual springs in it, that could make the difference. However, the issue could be that the foams in the mattress haven't broken in yet. That would particularly make sense if you feel there is a small hill in the middle, because you haven't slept there, so the foam where you sleep has just started to break in, while the middle hasn't. Whenever I'd get a new mattress in the store I worked at, I'd make an effort to break it in, so it will feel the way it's supposed to. Between customers, I'd lie on and roll around on the new mattress. In the case of Tempurpedic, I'd actually take my shoes off and walk on it to help break it in. That might be your issue, if it turns out the Kingsdown you saw was on a rigid foundation in the store.

Juan Zaldumbide Says

June 12, 2016 at 9:57 am

Hi, Thank you for a very well written and informative article. What is your opinion on Dynasty Mattresses? They have a very good review rating on Amazon. I am interested in their 14" Grand CoolBreeze GEL Memory Foam Mattress. It has the firmness that I am looking for plus a 4" top layer of gel memory foam for cooling. Their prices seem fair too. Thank you. Juan

Barbara Says

June 11, 2016 at 9:18 pm

Hello, I am interested in purchasing a Sterns and Foster King mattress. The name at Sears in the store is Sterns and Foster Estate Mckee Firm Pillowtop. It appears Sears.com leaves the name "Estate" out of the mattress' name. I was wondering if you have reference to this mattress and what the names are at other stores such as Macy's and Mattress Firm? When I look at Macy's it appears the following MIGHT be the same mattress? Stearns & Foster Estate Palace Luxury Firm Euro Pillowtop Mattress? Thank you for any help you can give me to cross reference this mattress at others stores so I can shop for the best price.

Rachel Says

June 11, 2016 at 5:08 pm

Any recommendation for a replacement mattress for a sleeper sofa, 60x72?

Cindy Says

June 11, 2016 at 10:34 am

Does the platform change the way the bed feels? I laid on a Kingsdown Regal mattress for about 30 minutes in the store (it was on a box spring) and I loved it so I bought it and now it is on my solid wood platform bed and it feels much stiffer. In fact, I feel like it bulges up in the middle like a small hill. I am so dismayed, I feel like I'm going to roll off of it. I was wondering if this was normal? If the Kingsdown isn't made for a platform, I could use that to take it back after my 30 day period is up without having to pay a $199 return fee. (Mattress Warehouse).

MattressNerd Says

May 8, 2016 at 8:29 am

I don't have any good suggestions for that low of a price. There are some cheap Chinese-made mattresses on Amazon for that price, and you can get some guest-room quality mattresses to put on the floor for that. Otherwise, what you're looking for just doesn't exist.

John Mitchell Says

May 7, 2016 at 5:25 am

Wow, a great article as always. I am a student currently living in a shared room with my best friend. I have a budget of about $300 and want to buy a new mattress out of it. It should be comfortable and wide enough for both of us. Any suggestions? Thank you.

Stuart McCloughin Says

April 25, 2016 at 7:45 pm

Lucky for you, Jared, that bed has a 10 year non-prorated warranty. This would include the sides not lasting. You should look for a mattresses comfort and support for when you're sleeping, not sitting on the side to put your shoes on in the morning. Spending 8 hours in bed and having the right support is important to your health. The last thing to worry about is how long the Beautyrest Foam Encasement will last, since if it doesn't it'll be replaced.

CC Says

April 18, 2016 at 3:05 pm

I enjoyed ready your informative article. I am looking for some mattresses for my nightly rental home. Guests will be spending a lot of time recreating outdoors and will enjoy and appreciate a good nights sleep. Any suggestions on a particular mattress?

MattressNerd Says

April 15, 2016 at 4:26 pm

Then they're both lying. If you don't believe me, read Simmons's warranty for yourself.

Jared Chandler Says

April 13, 2016 at 12:27 pm

Tried out a Beautyrest Black hybrid the other day. Wow! It felt good in the store. Right away, though, I could tell the sides would never hold up. I caved the sides fast and they didn't look like they came back so quickly. I can see that being a $2200 waste after a year.

Jared Chandler Says

April 13, 2016 at 12:23 pm

Both Macy's AND Mattress Firm are telling me this.

MattressNerd Says

April 13, 2016 at 8:47 am

Those retailers are lying. The warranty doesn't come through the retailer, it comes from the manufacturer. If you're looking at a Simmons, they don't require you to buy a boxspring from them, as long as it's on a rigid surface. If Mattress Firm is telling you that Simmons requires you to buy the matching boxspring, they're just lying to you to get more money.

Jared Chandler Says

April 12, 2016 at 8:29 pm

And if you don't get box springs, almost all the retailers says no warranty. It's a 300 dollar scam.

Jared Chandler Says

April 12, 2016 at 8:25 pm

I can see. It might be more expensive, INITIALLY, to get a firm mattress and then a good topper. BUT, I am thinking this could still pay off by having the mattress last longer, and just replacing a few hundred dollar topper. No? Mattress Firm had the Providence Simmons for 1347(mattress only), add in 300 for the foundation if I want the warranty. That sound like a deal?

MattressNerd Says

April 12, 2016 at 10:00 am

I really don't like Stearns and Foster because they tend to be rather overpriced for what you get. For example, that Signature at Ashley won't be much better than the Rosie at Mancini's.

Saumya Says

April 11, 2016 at 2:08 pm

Hi ! This is great info ! We need to buy an innerspring mattress as memory foam doesn't suit my husband. After trying out a lot of mattresses in different stores, we are down to these 4 - Stearns and Foster Estate Collection - Garrick Luxury firm at Macy's ($1697); Beautyrest Black collection - Reyna luxury firm at Macy's ($2317); Stearn and Foster Signature collection - Beckton firm tight top at Ashley ($1611) Beautyrest Recharge collection - Rosie Luxury firm at Mancini's sleepworld ($1000). All of them felt good when we tried for 10-15 mins in stores. We liked the S&F estate in Macy's the best. However, we are little concerned about the sagging issue that we read everywhere especially with S&F's. What would be your pick ? Any thoughts or feedback from you would be greatly helpful to make the decision. Thanks for your assistance.

Bill Hays Says

April 11, 2016 at 11:41 am

Great site and service. Your name comparison chart for Posturepedic allowed me test a mattress at Mattress Firm and buy it at Costco at a $600 savings. How nice is that. Thanks again.

MattressNerd Says

April 8, 2016 at 10:19 am

Getting the firm version then buying a separate topper is more expensive than just getting the plush version that you liked. On the other hand, if the topper wears out, it's easier to replace. So, that approach has its pros and cons.

Nancy Says

April 6, 2016 at 7:04 am

3 months ago we bought a Charles P. Rogers Estate Nano, and I wake up either uncomfortably warm or drenched in sweat. The mattress itself is comfortable. I have never experienced this before. I don't understand what there is about a mattress that can cause "sleeping hot".. We are returning it, but I don't know what to look for to replace it because I don't know what to avoid. Our previous mattresses were Sealy Posturepedics, (one was Cushion Firm, one was Plush,) and this never happened. We decided to go a bit more upscale. We're in the northeast, and enjoy sleeping under winter weight blankets. I've become a side sleeper with some arthritis and now want a softer surface than when I was younger. Thanks for any assistance.

Jared Chandler Says

April 5, 2016 at 8:23 pm

I am looking at the Simmons Providence/Teagan/Phillipbsurg Beautyrest Plush mattress. I am wondering if it is best to get the firm version and add a softer topper to it. Any thoughts on this approach? I currently just purchased a Serta Ridgemont from Sam's. It's supposed to be plush but is super firm and hurts my back. I am returning it. I tried the Providence plush in a store and quite liked it. It felt like the Serta Somersworth I had...only they had it for 1999 in the store. I think I paid 799 for the Somersworth Eurotop. Loved it for 4 years...then it started hurting my back.

MattressNerd Says

April 3, 2016 at 1:57 pm

Bed in a Box was one of the first of the mattress-in-a-box companies to come out, before they were popular, and they're really overpriced for what you get. I'd recommend any number of the newer ones over that. Leesa, Nest Bedding, etc, would all be better quality at a lower price. I don't have any other advice for you. It all comes down to finding the mattress that feels the best to you, and if the S&F models are it, and you've tried a lot of other brands, then you'll probably be happy with it. I'll need to double-check the links on the S&F page. Stores seem to keep changing their links around on me without warning.

Chris Farrell Says

April 3, 2016 at 2:48 am

I've looked at a few sites now and see no advice for hot sleepers. I'm sort of weird that I like my bedroom to be very cold, but I also love having an electric blanket. My body temp can crash during the night, so it's great to be able to quickly ramp up the heat, but by the same token, if I'm too hot, I can't sleep, so it's great to just be able to turn the blanket off, chill out quickly, and then fall back asleep. If I had a hot mattress, I'd not be able to do that. Got any advice as to what kind of mattress to get? I went into a Sleepy's today and the lady steered me away from all memory foam because I'm a hot sleeper. Apparently even with all the gel and such, they still get complaints. She said my best bet was two Stearns & Foster beds, DARSTON LUXURY PLUSH, and HYBRID LUXURY PLUSH. I do have to say that they felt nice, but they seemed overpriced. The review you have about them being so mirrors others that I've seen. I'm looking to spend about $2,700 or less (possibly a bit more) for a king with box spring. I saw your links to the Serta iSeries comparable mattresses, but most links were dead. Do you think something like this might fit my needs? I'm only 150 LBS and find that I prefer a softer mattress. I'm currently on an "extra firm" mattress, I think Beautyrest, and it's basically just a board. I hate it. Would one of these kinds of hybrids be best for me? Btw, I am kind of disappointed that, perhaps, memory foam is out for me because it has such great customer satisfaction. It feels weird to me currently, but I think that's probably because I'm used to a board. The TEMPUR-CLOUD SUPREME BREEZE seemed OK though. Btw, got any opinions about Bedinabox.com? When I was researching memory foam, they kept coming up as someplace that people really seemed to like a lot. Before today, I was really considering their Serenity GEL w/ CoolRest Adaptive Memory Foam Mattress. Thanks for any help!

Terry Says

March 30, 2016 at 9:38 pm

We've been in the market to by a mattress for some time and have been trying to do our homework, but I'm having trouble finding information online about the Sealy Posturepedic Artesia HD. We slept on one for three nights at a Marriott during a recent trip, and slept better than we have in quite awhile. I'm curious if you can steer me in the right direction, and would be interested in your opinion.

MattressNerd Says

March 29, 2016 at 5:41 pm

While the first part is true, I'm not convinced the S&F uses better foams and springs. In some cases, they use worse foam (consider the Costco S&F models, which are "stripped-down" models with mostly poly foam, for example). A high end Posturepedic can be better than an entry-level S&F, but due to MAP pricing, the S&F can be more expensive.

Andy Says

March 29, 2016 at 1:26 pm

Just like Toyota and Lexus are the same company with Lexus being the luxury brand, same is true for Stears & Foster. Stearns & Foster and Sealy are the same company. Stears & Foster better foams and springs.

MattressNerd Says

March 28, 2016 at 2:22 pm

They're okay. I'm not a huge fan, but they're decent. I am not a big fan of the fact that they're innerspring mattresses in which the coils are tied together. It should be pretty strong, but it's a little hard and bouncy for my tastes, and they're not exactly cheap for what you get.

Bill Says

March 27, 2016 at 1:22 pm

I am reading a number of very positive comments about Saatvia mattresses for quality as well as its customer service. Do you have any thoughts about them? Thanks. Your website has been very helpful.

K Walker Says

March 26, 2016 at 10:32 pm

The salesman was willing to "work" with us. Would $3000 out the door for a Queen be a fair price? The materials used & craftsmanship seem to be very high quality.

Dani Says

March 26, 2016 at 5:21 pm

I bought the Black line Beautyrest-Evie. It has been a few weeks and I dont feel like it has been that great. I do not know what to do. I have laid on so many beds at so many stores. I am frustrated.

MattressNerd Says

March 26, 2016 at 8:52 am

Aireloom tends to be good quality, but they're a little expensive for what you get. And it's difficult to comparison shop or haggle on price for them.

MattressNerd Says

March 26, 2016 at 8:52 am

The Hybrid feels a little bouncier and a little softer than the Medium. There's no real advantage of one over the other; it's just personal preference.

K Walker Says

March 25, 2016 at 9:30 pm

Your article has been very helpful, thank you. On our first trip out to find a new mattress, we tried the Airloom Selena luxury plush. Apparently they don't do a lot of marketing, I had never heard of it? It was pricier than we wanted but didn't find anything else that compared to it. Do you know much about this product? Is there something similar to it? Pros? Cons? Any thoughts would be appreciated. Thanks.

Doug Says

March 25, 2016 at 10:26 am

I am trying to decide between the Alexander Medium and the Hybrid. Are there any distinct advantages either has over the other?

MattressNerd Says

March 10, 2016 at 12:03 pm

Most places don't sell split queen adjustable mattresses. It's easy for a king, because a king is just two twin extra longs together. I don't know of any mattresses which are 30x80. They would have to be custom made. That's not something you can get from just any retail store.

Bob Rodi Says

March 9, 2016 at 11:17 pm

Great site. Very informative. My wife and I would like to get an adjustable bed. I had a hip replacement last year and I have some issues with my back. My favorite place to sleep is in my recliner so I am guessing an investment in an adjustable bed is worthwhile. My issue is that we have a queen bed now. While there are a lot of choices for Queen adjustable what we really need is a "split queen". I like the bells and whistles like massage and separate remotes. We saw a couple of companies at our local home and garden show here in Pittsburgh and I was surprised to see that they both had split queens. There was large variation in price and, of course, they both told me that they were the manufacturers of the beds. After reading some of the info here I am not sure I believe that. One was priced at $5K and one was priced at $6K. The beds were pretty much identical. Do you have any suggestions for me for a split queen, adjustable, separate remotes, etc. Thanks

Roger Says

March 8, 2016 at 5:21 pm

hello I weigh 230 lbs. I bought an ultra firm Stearns and Foster mattress from ashleys furniture first 3 days I slept on it I called and complained it was too firm, they did nothing about it and said that I had to break it in and it would be fine after that. then now after having it for over a year there's a divot in it where I sleep. I called the technicians out it has only a half inch depression so they say but when I sleep on it it hurts my back because it is sagging much more that that, I can actually slide to the middle and there's a high spot on it. and the manufacturer and Ashley will do nothing about this....what are my options and what can I do about this to finally get a good night sleep??????? Restless

MattressNerd Says

March 6, 2016 at 7:51 pm

It's better than what I grew up with. I'd probably get something a little plusher personally, since 6 year olds are fairly light and don't need something very firm to hold them in alignment.

Matt Benge Says

March 6, 2016 at 7:18 pm

I am considering purchasing a full size Sealy Caversham for our 6yo daughter. Any thoughts for, against, or other recommendations in consideration of purchasing a mattress for a girl to from up using? Thanks for all your great insight and information! Matt Nashville

MattressNerd Says

February 28, 2016 at 10:28 pm

Costco has really good prices on Sealy Posturepedic, and I'm not even an affiliate with them. The main downside is it's tough to try the mattresses at Costco, so you're better off getting another retailer to match a Costco price.

Alexandria Says

February 28, 2016 at 12:14 am

This website has been amazing for picking out a new bed, seriously you do all the work for us! Thank you!

Lili Says

February 23, 2016 at 8:52 pm

Hi, we live in Hawaii so have pretty limited and very expensive options. Costco has the Sealy Posturepdic "Ashton" California King set for $1000. When we checked the big mattress store the bed I fell in love with was the Beautyrest RC Audrina Luxury Firm Pillowtop which is $1500. My husband is a Costco fan and a would rather save the $500. I would love to have the nicer bed, the free delivery and the $20 haul away fee. I work in an industry where I sell to Costco (not beds obviously or I wouldn't be asking!) and I know that they really do get the best price for their members but I would love your opinion. Mahalo (thanks!)

Esprix Says

February 23, 2016 at 7:33 pm

Excellent article, and exactly what I'm looking for in buying my first real mattress. Thank you!

MattressNerd Says

February 13, 2016 at 11:32 am

That manager was lying his ass off. It's not the 2014 model. It's new as of 2015. I've never heard of Mattress Firm actually giving away the mattress for free, but I'd love to see somebody take them to court for it.

Joi Bixler Says

February 10, 2016 at 11:12 pm

Last week I bought a Beautyrest Vinings Plush model queen size from Mattress Firm. Afterwards I found your Beautyrest Recharge 2015 comparison chart and looked up competitors prices. According to the chart, the comparable model at US Mattress is called Lydia Manor Plush. I don't find that exact name on US Mattress web site, but I find Lydia Manor II Plush. The description looks comparable, and it was on sale for $81 less than I paid. Today I went back to Mattress Firm to take advantage of their Low Price Guarantee. The manager argued that the Lydia Manor II Plush pictured on the ad I printed from the web site was last years model. I said, "Isn't the bed I bought the 2015 model also?" Then he said the bed in the ad was the 2014 model; he could tell because of the navy trim instead of the gray. At one point he also said the bed in the ad was actually the next step up with 1000 coils, but last years model. His sales associate corrected him and pointed out that it was the same 850 coil count. The manager reluctantly agreed to match the price. As the sales associate entered the price from the ad into the computer, I asked about the 10% they are supposed to beat that price by. The manager continued to protest and told the associate to give it to me for $10 less than the ad price, and thereby they "beat" the competitors price. The manager also asked me where I got the comparison chart and when I told him MattressNerd he said that this web site is owned by US Mattress. Although I'd had a good experience with Mattress Firm so far, I expected that getting them to honor their Low Price Guarantee would be a battle, so I didn't argue and left with the refund they gave me, which was $45 less than it should have been had they beat the competitors price by 10% as their Guarantee states, "or it's free". Now I'm wondering, is the Lydia Manor II Plush truly comparable to the Vinings Plush? Is the model pictured on US Mattress' web site the 2014 model? And since they did not honor their Low Price Guarantee by beating the competitor's price by 10%, am I actually eligible for a full refund, and if so, is there really any way to accomplish that?

MattressNerd Says

February 10, 2016 at 4:45 pm

You must be shopping for a Simmons Beautyrest at Sleepy's. No, a thin strip of latex deep down in the mattress in the center third is not a big exclusive, especially if they're charging you a lot more for it.

Colleen Blum Says

February 10, 2016 at 1:16 pm

Considering an interspring pillow top mattress. Retailer is stressing the "blended latex band" that is in the center third of the mattress as making a big difference. Any thoughts on this?

Rebekah Says

February 1, 2016 at 1:59 am

Great! Thanks! I will put off buying a mattress for another two weeks for President's Day! Your site is great and extremely helpful, by the way!

MattressNerd Says

January 31, 2016 at 8:58 am

Usually, the big "mattress" holidays will feature lower prices and salesmen more willing to negotiate to hit their higher targets. By "mattress holidays," I mean President's Day, Labor Day, and Memorial Day.

Rebekah Says

January 29, 2016 at 9:12 pm

Is there a best time of year to buy a mattress? Or with negotiating, it doesn't really matter?

MattressNerd Says

January 7, 2016 at 11:12 am

Everything I've read indicates that Brooklyn Bedding is one of the dozen or so companies I'd consider "in the middle of the pack" of the new companies that came out recently, which is why I haven't reviewed them. I just didn't see anything special worth reviewing. I'm sure it's a decent mattress, but I can't really tell you anything further than that.

gilles Says

January 7, 2016 at 3:10 am

Your site is very instructive. I am down to 2 choices: The Leesa and the the Brooklyn Bedding which you have not reviewed but is highly rated. Would appreciate your review and opinion

Jerre Bruyn Says

January 3, 2016 at 10:01 pm

What is the best alternative to a waterbed? Looking for comfort and warmth.

Jerre Says

January 3, 2016 at 9:59 pm

I have been sleeping in a waterbed for the past many years. I am returning to a more conventional mattress and would appreciate your recommendation. I kept my water bed full so it was relatively firm. I am a side sleeper and sleep alone so no need to consider how much mattress transfers others movements. What would you recommend?

MattressNerd Says

January 3, 2016 at 11:38 am

Since mattresses no longer use true "boxsprings" with actual springs in them, it really don't matter if you use a rigid "boxspring" foundation vs a platform bed. The end result for the mattress is exactly the same.

Molly Says

January 3, 2016 at 11:15 am

Thank you for your reviews- this was very helpful information for us novices. Can you tell me more about the options of using a box spring vs a platform type bed? I often see no boxspring on beds more frequently and some mattresses not sold as a set. thank you!

MattressNerd Says

December 31, 2015 at 10:24 am

Stomach sleepers tend to need much firmer mattresses than, say, side sleepers. You don't want the mattress sinking in at all when you're on your stomach, because the body isn't designed to arch backwards like that all night. It's perfectly fine to be bent slightly forward, so back sleepers can get away with some softness. Pillowtops will generally be softer than the non-pillowtop versions of the mattress, so for a stomach sleeper, I'd recommend against most pillowtops, unless it's exceptionally firm. Pillowtops generally sag a little more over time than non pillowtops, too. Foam tends to compress by a certain percentage over time. For example, if a type of foam will compress by about 10% in 7 years, that's not a big deal if you have 2 inches of foam. That's a 0.2 inch indent. If you have 10 inches of foam or something, that's an inch of depression, which is much more noticeable.

MattressNerd Says

December 31, 2015 at 10:17 am

1.8 pound HR foam is pretty much the standard most places use. The Nest Bedding mattresses use 2.0 pound, and that's basically built like a tank, and there is even a new one that came out that uses 2.5 pound density, but that's almost $2k. Some places only use 1.5 density, and I'd consider that to be low. Also, density of the foam isn't correlated to the firmness of the foam. The HR poly foam on the base tends to be very hard regardless of the density. So no, it doesn't mean it will "sink in more." The foams up top will have a FAR greater impact on how far it sinks in than the bottom.

Leanne Says

December 31, 2015 at 1:02 am

Thank you for all this information! I am interested in learning more about Leesa's density of the foam. Their website says the bottom 6" layer is 1.8 pcf. If my searching is correct, it looks like that is not a very dense foam. Does that mean the bed will be softer or let one "sink into the bed" more? I'm leaning toward purchasing the Leesa, but do not want it to be too soft. Also, do you have any suggestions for a good quality waterproof mattress protector? Currently with our innerspring mattress, we have a mattress pad. In switching to a foam mattress, is it a good idea to have both the waterproof mattress protector and a mattress pad on top of that? Or is it not recommended to use a mattress pad with a foam mattress? Thanks for all your help and info!!

David Says

December 30, 2015 at 5:25 pm

I'm a stomach sleeper which after reading a few buyer guides, such as yours, seems unusual. My last mattress purchase was for a pillow top, queen size, and not sure that was a wise move. I would say I think a firm mattress is what I'd prefer but I know that term means different things to each person and manufacturer. So I guess the question is if you have any thoughts on pillow tops, longevity, support, etc. ? I'm about to begin the shopping process. Thanks for the article and any reply if you have one on this question.

MattressNerd Says

December 20, 2015 at 2:44 pm

If you have a platform bed, you don't need the boxspring. Just put the mattress directly on the platform bed.

Nancy Says

December 20, 2015 at 8:48 am

Living in an apartment, we sleep on a platform bed because of the much-needed storage drawers underneath. I've developed aging lower back issues and our Sealy Posturepedic Cushion Firm (I've no idea what it's made of) now feels so hard that I end up heading for the couch in the middle of the night. Question: in buying a new mattress, will a box spring make a mattress softer if we still are placing mattress on existing wooden platform bed frame? Would the bed be too high.? Or, can a thicker softer mattress suffice without having to give up the platform base? Would you suggest going for foam or innerspring; box spring or not; give up the platform? Thanks for any guidance you can offer, and thanks for all your excellent information!!

Rhonda Ellison Says

December 7, 2015 at 7:42 pm

This was very helpful, thank you!

MattressNerd Says

December 6, 2015 at 7:40 pm

Almost no mattresses can be flipped these days. The thicker layers of foam on mattresses aren't actually very supportive when also put on the bottom. That said, you can find some mattresses designed for hotels that can be flipped. Serta makes some like that. US Mattress has some on sale here.

Lauren Says

December 6, 2015 at 7:36 pm

Thank you so much for all your advice. We had a queen size mattress with a pillow top that we loved, which could be flipped. (This mattress is still going strong and is still quite comfortable.) 10 years later, we moved- put that queen mattress in our guest room and then bought a King size mattress from the same company. We spent good money on it but very early on, it developed what I call The Hippopotamus between my husband and me and we can't flip this mattress to help the problem. Now, The Hippopotamus is so large it is pushing me to the edge of our bed, we want to purchase a new mattress. Do you have a list of mattresses that can be flipped? Thank you!

MattressNerd Says

November 27, 2015 at 9:54 pm

One of the direct-to-consumer mattresses is a good option. That way if she doesn't like it, she can send it back and you can buy her a different mattress. I don't recommend getting a mattress without trying it unless it has a free return policy. I'm personally a big fan of Leesa, since it's right in the middle of firmness and price and it has a generous return policy.

MattressNerd Says

November 27, 2015 at 9:51 pm

Foam mattresses tend to sag less than innerspring mattresses, because most don't have a "quilt" layer. The quilt layer in a mattress tends to be artificially fluffed up, especially the ones in showrooms, because it looks nicer. That is designed to mat down a bit when you get them, maybe half an inch. That's why the threshold for a sag is 1.5 inches. That first half inch isn't really structural. From what you describe, the Leesa seems to hit all of those features. You're looking for an all foam mattress in any case, and the Leesa is a good example of a medium-firm one. Unless you wanted to pay triple the price and get Tempurpedic.

Connie Kohler Says

November 27, 2015 at 9:31 pm

We want to surprise my sister with a new bed. She has back problems often accompanied by sciatica. Since it is a surprise and we live several hundred miles away she can't try it out before we buy it. What do you recommend?

Ellen Says

November 27, 2015 at 9:08 pm

I love your expertese all in one stop! thank you. Though I still may purchase a Leesa I'm skeptical of buying online b/c of my back problems. The current mattress I have left me with an indentation after the first year only to get worse. I just spoke with Saatva (not my current mattress) and I really liked their product until they also told me that theirs would sag /indent too. And that all mattresses would unless I went with a 'tight top' mattress. I don't like the sagging because I don't feel supported after it begins to sag and then with the outer edges not sagging it forces you to roll inward which I also don't like. Can you provide some feedback here? 1) Looking for a medium firm, cool sleeping mattress that will conform to my body and keep me in alignment, I am a side sleeper, and I do not want any permanent sagging. I also want to feel like the bed is 'holding' me if you will. Thanks in advance!

ravi Says

November 27, 2015 at 8:45 am

fantastic summary and very knowledgeable for a beginner like me. thank you.

MattressNerd Says

November 16, 2015 at 10:24 pm

Englander is generally crap. I once saw a $1500 Englander mattress with a 1 year warranty. Two sided mattresses work for mattresses that didn't use much padding on top at all. When you're almost directly on top of the coils, it didn't matter which side of the coils you slept on. As mattresses added more foam up top, in particular memory foam, it made less sense to add that soft foam on the bottom, since it just squished down and didn't offer as much support. Honestly, I'd rather be really comfortable for 8 years on a mattress and then trade it out than be kind of okay for 40 years on one mattress. Floor models are a decent idea, but they're not always around. They're more common in the first quarter of the year.

Marty Says

November 16, 2015 at 3:50 am

What about mattresses not found in big store chains, such as Englander, and also, two sided mattresses that can be flipped. My parents still have a Sealy Posturepedic two-sided mattress that is over 40 years old and is still comfortable. It was their original mattress, and then mine, and now it's the guest room mattress. Here in Michigan, Art Van Furniture has a large selection of Mattresses(http://www.artvan.com/Furniture/Store/ArtVan__10001_10052_ ). Another way to get a great mattress at a cheap price, buy the floor sample. About 3 years ago I was shopping for mattresses everywhere and couldn't make up my mind if I wanted a firm or a plush mattress. I then went to Macy's after I heard an ad on the radio for therir Presidents day clearance sale. All their mattresses were 40-60% off to make room for the new models coming in. They were selling the showroom models. I tried one out that was firm on one side and plush on the other side and liked both sides equally. It was a Simmons Beautyrest World Class with a suggested retail price(but never sells for that price) of $2,899, the everyday low price was $2,399. I checked the price of the firm one online and it was listed for $1,899. The Dual showroom model was like $869 , and then they had half off all clearance prices. Then they were giving an extra 15% off the price if you applied for a and got approved on the spot for a Macy's card, which I did. The price came out to about $439, but after taxes and $75 for a box spring(a good deal) total price came out to about $519. If I would have wanted the same bed in the firm or plush model only, since it wasn't in stock and they would have had to order it, it would have been about $1,899 and after discounts would have been about $1,300. It's going on 4 years in February and I have to say I love my mattress. One side is Firm and the other side is Plush. There is a slight bump in the middle but it doesn't bother me. I already had a frame, and bought my waterproof cover for about $35 on sale. The sales lady told me to get a waterproof cover somewhere else because Macy's charged $110 for their but that I could get it elsewhere for cheaper. So an alternative is the Showroom Floor models. Presidents day sale--it's in February.

MattressNerd Says

November 9, 2015 at 1:10 pm

Never heard of them, so I don't really have an opinion either way.

bruce Says

November 8, 2015 at 1:12 pm

Would you recommend buying a mattress set from American freight?

Pauline Says

November 8, 2015 at 12:29 pm

I bought a Hilton bed because I like the beds at Hilton hotels The bed was comfortable for 10 months. I did eventually get them to come out and look at the bed. But all they changed was the box spring. I still stay at Hilton hotels and their beds seem great. But mine is horrible Hilton has a local mattress factory make the bed. Our local mattress factory must be terrible

LGoose Says

October 23, 2015 at 1:55 pm

Hello, what mattress is most comparable to the Marriott mattress. I love that one?? Thank you LGoose

MattressNerd Says

September 25, 2015 at 10:48 am

I haven't heard of them; they seem to be a very small mattress company. The V7 foam one looks to be a fairly basic gel memory foam mattress. As long as you're not paying too much money for it, it's fine. It's 3 inches of gel memory foam on top of 8 inches of HR poly foam. If you are getting it for less than $1000 for a queen mattress, it's an okay price. I can't comment on their warranty or durability or anything else like that since I know so little about them, but they seem okay.

andrew Says

September 25, 2015 at 9:19 am

I have been thinking about getting a Verlo foam mattress but have not been able to find really any reviews of them anywhere. They make the mattress in the store based on what you want but I have not been able to find much in the way of the overall quality. I was in a MattressFirm and mentioned Verlo and the salesman there got very snarky, saying 'good luck, those are homemade mattresses - it would be like if I went back there and put one together for you!' i dont know how or why that would make a difference or if he was having a bad day or what but if you have any sort of info on Verlo (especially their v7 foam) I would really appreciate it!

MattressNerd Says

September 24, 2015 at 11:09 am

Leesa is a better mattress overall. If you can afford the extra $200, I'd recommend getting the Leesa. If you're tight on money, and might upgrade your mattress in a few years anyway, the Tuft and Needle is a decent place to start.

MattressNerd Says

September 24, 2015 at 11:08 am

I have an article about boxsprings here. They don't always have to be replaced, but they often do. Boxsprings usually run between $100 and $400 depending on quality and size.

Lee Wolfson Says

September 24, 2015 at 10:08 am

Nothing has been mentioned about the box springs. Do they always have to be replaced? If not how can you tell if they are okay or not? Some adds quote 2 piece sets or 3 piece sets(king) while others quote mattress only which would indicate people are often not replacing the box springs, If they are being bought with mattress, how much of total price do they represent? What if you buy online? Please comment.

Sherry Says

September 24, 2015 at 1:54 am

ps. i'm a small asian girl weighing at 115lbs with chronic (mild to medium) lowback pain (i frequently visit my chiropractor)

Sherry Says

September 24, 2015 at 1:50 am

I'm torn between Leesa's and Tuft&Needle's mattress. From what I'm reading, your experiences with Leesa are superb! However I'm a bit hesitant because of the pricing. It's a $215.00 difference and I'm really torn. Do you know anything more on Tuft&Needle's mattress? Is Leesa worth the ~$200 extra? Please help! Sincerely, Sherry

Catherine Says

September 17, 2015 at 4:06 pm

I am a mattress rsa for almost 30 years and i think this is a very well written compilation of what consumers needs to understand before they make an investment that is most important to their health. I will recommend this website. Catherine

MattressNerd Says

August 28, 2015 at 2:24 am

1) People are generally okay with spending a little more on a mattress in store. But it's just hubris to expect customers to spend $800 extra in store for the sake of "having respect for the profession." Have some respect for your customers wallets, please. 2) The "exclusives" that specialty stores get are not a "huge advantage." Rather, they are a hindrance that make comparison shopping more difficult. For example, Sleepy's using an anti-microbial cover on their Posturepedics that Sears or Costco doesn't have doesn't justify the extra $500 you'll pay for the queen set, but it does make it such that Sleepy's gets to ignore their 20% price guarantee. 3) "Hybrid" mattresses are not a new category. They're just innersprings. In some cases, the innersprings have the foams up top shaped a little differently and the ticking isn't sown into the quilt the same way. That doesn't make it a new category of bed. You're buying into your own hype.

Mike Says

August 26, 2015 at 6:20 pm

Please do not go into a mattress specialty store, learn all about the product and not buy from the salesman unless he/she gives you a reason not to. It is not fair business practice and is a little disrespectful. The art of selling and explaining is why you would buy from a salesman. Please have a respect for the profession and not be cheap. The cheaper people are the higher the prices will continue to rise... Also, Site Admin, please note that in specialty stores, I.E. Sleepys, Mattressfirm, a huge advantage are the exclusives that the stores get versus amazon, or sears. Give them more advantages please. Also add the 3rd category of bed which is a hybrid bed.

Janelle Says

August 21, 2015 at 8:37 am

Thank you for this terrific post. I read an article about your site in an Insommnia magazine while waiting for my daughter at the doctors office. My husband and I have been wanting to buy a new mattress for the last year however I always end up getting panicked about making the final purchase. I'm a light sleeper and toss and turn a lot. I have a few herniated discs in my neck so need comfort. Our last mattress is about 11 years old and we got sucked into buying one for over $3,000 at that time, thinking it would be great. It is independent coil with some type of very thick natural topper and has felt too soft for years. We love our top of the line mattress from IKEA that is in our guest room and I've considered buying one for our room because they have a 90 day return policy but husband is worried about quality for every night use. The King size independent coil with memory memory foam topper is about $800. Then, we recently stayed in the Langham Hotel in Chicago and had three nights of amazing sleep on the Black Label Simmons Beautyrest. I found that they have a hotel buying program and I can get that exact mattress delivered for about $1,600. I would jump on buying it but there is no return policy. It's from their recharge line with 1029 coil count for the King mattress, a special edge support, but three layers of foam in the topper (not memory foam). I received detailed info from Simmons but it's confusing to me. I'm just hesitant to buy because of the no return policy.... Any thoughts or suggestions? Thanks! Janelle

b.jonh Says

July 30, 2015 at 8:53 am

I always feel confused on how to choose the most suitable mattress for me and my family until I read this article. Thank you so much for sharing experience!

Frank Says

July 21, 2015 at 7:18 am

Jack was fantastic. He is a very knowledgable person in this field. I emailed him with a few questions, a quote that I received from a mattress store, and he found the exact mattress for 35% cheaper than what I was originally going to purchase. Will definately consult with Jack again in the future if he is still around doing this!

Carol Says

July 16, 2015 at 3:08 pm

Can you comment on the quality of Saatva thinking of purchasing one and utterly confused thank you

MattressNerd Says

June 24, 2015 at 11:17 am

If your old mattress is newer, you might be able to donate it to a charity. You can also try selling on Craigslist. If it's an old, broken down mattress, you can see if your town offers mattress pickups with your trash, or drive it to the landfill, or see if you can find a recycling company. If you have to return an online mattress, you can sleep on a guest room bed, the new mattress that you're replacing the online mattress with, a couch, the floor, etc.

A J Peabody Says

June 24, 2015 at 10:35 am

When you buy online, how do you get rid of the old mattress? For that matter, if you don't have a place to store the old mattress, what do you sleep on if you have to return the online mattress?

Amie Says

June 23, 2015 at 12:09 pm

Thank you for your thoughtful article and responses. Looking for a firm mattress that is hypoallergenic. Was led to the Palmspring coconut fibre mattress. Would love to hear your thoughts. Is it as durably firm as they claim? Could it help battle dust mite inspired allergies? Thank you in advance.

Teri Says

June 15, 2015 at 1:55 pm

A post on the best return policies other than those you mention would be helpful. I have gone through SO many mattresses and in general have not found the foam ones of any type to work for me. Although those companies seem to have the best return policies, and I appreciate that they work with charities and/or recycling. My issue is I would need the return to include (ideally) free pickup. Thanks so much for your work! what do you know/think about Saatva ?

MattressNerd Says

April 14, 2015 at 12:50 pm

I love memory foam mattresses and sleep on a Leesa. However, they don't deliver to Mexico.

Lori Redmond Says

April 14, 2015 at 10:23 am

Thank you for writing such a great and informative article. The best I have ready so far. We live in the Yucatan and are shopping for a new mattress as the original one we bought when we built are house was not the best and I wake up everyday with back pain and tired. May I ask what type of mattress you have? We have looked at Sealy, Serta and many others. If I could get and Tuft and Needle to deliver to Mexico I would probably buy it. We are looking for a mattress that does not hold the heat as it is hot enough it Mexico and do not need to add anymore heat to our lives. Thank you again for a great article! Gracias, Lori

Brenda Phoenix Curtis Says

April 12, 2015 at 11:52 pm

I want to thank you for an excellent article with information that took the fear out of mattress buying, for me. I decided to go with a Stearns & Foster because I had two previously. However, I was an informed consumer when I entered the store and was able to speak "mattress" language. I selected a high end model that I feel certain I will be satisfied with. One of my previous mattressses was too firm, and I didn't want to make that mistake again. I can only repeat, thank you!!!

MattressNerd Says

April 1, 2015 at 2:18 pm

I know very little about horsehair mattresses, unfortunately. You can probably find something that feels just about as comfortable and supportive for less, but whether it's worth it is entirely up to you and what fits your budget.

Amy Says

April 1, 2015 at 1:13 pm

I would love to know more about handmade/horsehair mattresses. We tried them out in a furniture store and they felt incredible, but are very pricey. I'd love to hear a non-biased opinion of those. Thank you. This site has been extremely informative and helpful.

vikki Says

March 28, 2015 at 1:08 pm

Hi, we are returning a latex adjustable mattress it just wasn't comfortable. Our daughter has a Beautyrest recharge lux firm and we like it, but I'm worried that it may not be as motion transferable as I need. For the least motion tranf would it be the Beautyrest 1000 or the BR Black. I don't know the difference between the two of them. Now I'm worried about reading all of the sagging issues w/the BR, is this a problem with this mattress? I was looking at the Tempurpedic and heard both good and bad about them as well and my husband sleeps warm. Not sure what to get. Thank you for any input

MattressNerd Says

March 17, 2015 at 12:11 pm

That used to be my favorite guest room bed back in the day. Not sure I'd recommend it for everynight use. I haven't seen one of those in years, so I don't know how the latest models are, if they're still around.

Stephanie Elam Says

March 17, 2015 at 10:08 am

Kingsdown emerald crown series-- any thoughts on this brand ?

MattressNerd Says

February 13, 2015 at 7:04 am

It seems to be a pretty good option, if a little on the expensive side, but I know a little less about them, so it's something I need to do more research on. The good thing is they have a return policy.

Alex D. Says

February 12, 2015 at 10:42 am

Very nice article. Love the information and breakdowns, but I have a question for you; Sleeplikethedead rates BedInABox.com very highly. Do you have any thoughts on them?

Jen Says

February 8, 2015 at 10:40 am

I am 6'2", over 300 lbs, female and a side sleeper. I prefer a firm mattress and have had terrible luck in the past. (I bought a $1200 Simmons Beautyrest last year and there's a huge sink in the middle of it. They're refusing to honor the warranty and take it back and I just need a new mattress. Trying to sleep on this thing is terrible.) Anyway, I'm interested in the online shops like Caspar and Leesa, but I've never purchased a memory foam mattress before. Which would hold up the best for someone my size?

MattressNerd Says

January 19, 2015 at 8:39 pm

The Leesa is a good alternative to the whole mattress buying process outlined here. It's a way to get a decent quality mattress in kind of a medium firmness to see if it works and avoid all of the hassle of going into stores and negotiating prices. Then, if it doesn't work, you can just return it and then go through the whole buying process. So yes, the Leesa is a fine option to kinda "short circuit" the whole process, and it's a low risk option with the free return policy.

Dan Mos Says

January 19, 2015 at 1:47 pm

I have found your site very helpful. I am considering a split adjustable King. Would you recommend the Leesa Mattress?

cody Says

December 21, 2014 at 11:08 pm

Thanks for the time you took to write such an informative post.

Rick Says

November 15, 2014 at 9:41 am

Hi after reading many of your articles, I notice stearns & Foster as a high end mattress. Can you shed any more information on this brand? I am planning on spending around 1500 on this next purchase. Thanks, Rick

MattressNerd Says

October 21, 2014 at 11:08 pm

I agree, maybe one day. I don't know how my current employer would feel about this site, though, so for now, I'd like to not put my face out there so much. Great idea for the future, though.

Alex Says

October 21, 2014 at 11:07 pm

Thanks, Would it be possible to have videos on what you talk about? I find videos a lot more easier to go through than reading walls of text.

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